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There is a variant of bingo where songs are called up instead of bingo balls for players to daub their cards. Called “music bingo,” the cells in the grid are either song titles or the music artists themselves. It’s a rather interesting variant that mixes a “Name That Tune” vibe to the traditional bingo game, which translates to an activity rife not only with the thrill of the prize chase, but also with great music. 

If you decide to hold a music bingo party of your own, one of the better themes to go with is that age of true funk: the disco era. Jumpsuits, bellbottoms, huge fros, and the occasional roller skates should be the fashion-of-choice for this party to be blessed by bingogodz.com’s disco-lovin’ Afro-Dity; but more than that, the music has to steer clear of the usual Bee Gees staples that everyone and their mothers are already very familiar with. 

For the game to really present a challenge, the track list should comprise of songs that sound awfully familiar, but whose titles are just at the tips of your tongues. As an added twist, said familiarity may be attributed to the fact that the songs may have been sampled on – or at the very least directly influenced – more recent hits. Not only will this ignite bouts of nostalgia in the older players, but the young ones may even get a few lessons in pop music history. 

For instance, there’s Donna Summer’s concept of “future sound,” I Feel Love. If the song sounds like something you’ve heard before, it’s probably because it was the one that led to the development of techno. Everyone from Daft Punk to Moby owes their existence to this synthesizer-based track with a disco beat. There’s also Manu Dibango’s Soul Makossa, whose chants of “ma-mako, ma-masa, mama-makossa” should be recognizable to Rihanna, Kanye West, and Michael Jackson fans. 

And then there’s the legendary Marvin Gaye’s Got to Give It Up. This percussion-and-bass-heavy number was sited by Robin Thicke as his most favorite song, leading to the composition of his international breakout (and quasi-infamous) hit Blurred Lines, complete with falsetto vocals. 

These are but a few examples of the many more songs of the ‘70s that have survived in some form or another today. With songs like these in your music bingo session, the groovy vibe is sure to keep the party going to the max! 

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